Friday, November 21, 2008

Sophi-onics... or something like that

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"Mommy you're the BEST", she says with all the exuberance of one of her favorite Noggin characters....

"Sophia, you're the best", as my heart melts... while I'm sick of EVERYONE on noggin, it's my Sophia. It's precious.

"No I'm not! I'm a girl! You're the best!"


wait a minute.
and suddenly, even though she's smiling her sweetest smile and clinging to me like a little monkey, I'm not so sure this is a compliment at all ...


It's so interesting watching them learn to speak. Sometimes I really do wonder if her words hold the same meaning for her as they do for me. Most of them do I think. But then she says things like "Daddy's a boy, mom! Not a man. Papa's a man, Daddy's a boy and I'm a girl and mommy's a girl and Mila's a girl.... (she rattles off this new found list of information multiple times a day).

And then I think how confusing it must be sometimes to hear me say for example, how much I love her and Mila and Daddy, but to also hear me confess (probably with just as much enthusiasm) my love for chocolate and ice cream, and quiet time, and rain. I'd hate for her to think I really do feel for her just like I do about the new smooth-riding plastic carts at Super-Target.

Then sometimes it feels like I'm watching someone learn a second language, knowing the main words needed but forgetting how to assemble them all. "Whoooooooo somebody turned off my teedee show (tv)?!" or "Whooooo somebody colored on my paper?!" (who colored on my paper?) That one's so cute to me, sometimes I don't even repeat it back correctly. Don't tell her speech therapist.

Did I ever mention Sophia's in speech therapy? Sometimes I'm not sure she needs to be. But she was definitely a bit slower to talk than a few of her friends... and then she really got rolling and communicating, but a lot of the words were really hard to understand... especially if you're not me. Lot's of dropped consonants at the end, no hard G's or K's, no S-with-another-consonant combination (and that seems normal if they say, for example, "sand" instead of "stand" but she'll drop the S at the beginning and the consonant at the end so it comes out as "tan"... and that's pretty hard to figure out, if it's slightly out of context.

The whole thing stresses me out because I DON'T want to make something of nothing and give her a complex like she needed special help, when I KNOW how bright and amazing she is. But I don't want to miss a chance to get her up to speed if she's not. I feel like this whole real-mom thing is coming on so fast. She was a tiny baby, now she's in preschool AND speech therapy. Next thing I know she'll be getting kindergarten kisses like little Grace Smylie! (If you haven't already checked Sarie's blog, you should now, you'll thank me) Oh... motherhood. You think you're there, and then each stage makes you feel like NOW you're there. I'm thrilled but sometimes terrified for all of it. Sigh....
Off to SD for my sister's shower this weekend. Ciao.

8 comments:

Kara said...

That is one of the most beautiful pictures I have ever seen. What a pretty girl!
I'm in the process of getting Katelyn into speech therapy at school. I have the same feelings as you. I don't want to label her or make her feel like she's different, but I also feel like why not nip it in the bud while she's young.

Sarie said...

I was talking with a friend about this. Her lovely daughter (Lily) has been in Speech Therapy for years. I asked her if she was afraid that it would make Lily feel inferior or singled out... and she said if there's something out there that will HELP her daughter in ANY way, then she felt like it was her duty to utilize that help. And that her daughter will thank her for wanting to help so badly that she explored every avenue. And then it made better sense to me. Good luck. And seriously, you are so nice. The nicest. "The best!"

Sarie said...

ps. gorgeous photo!

Alysa said...

Cute post. Maddie was in speech for two months. I found that Carson was speaking for her and we weren't encouraging her to speak. It was cleared up and all was well with the world again. It was fascinating to go through the experience. Now that girl talks all the time. You are smart to get help early. She would feel more inferior if she didn't have a speech therapist. If you can clear up a lot of the speech situations, it will help her feel more confident rather than not clearing them up at all. It's overwhelming at times, isn't it?

Alysa said...

It cut off my last part -- You are doing a good job little momma.

Rachelle said...

SO far ALL of my boys have been, or are in speech threapy, and it looks like Luke will be too. Don't ask me why. I thought maybe it was a boy thing, but I guess not. Needing speech therapy is no relfection on a kiddo's brilliance, and it will only help their self confidence, especailly amoung other kids. Good to start early.

Megan said...

Interesting thing I got to read this. Ryan was a late talker and now he seems to have a better vocabulary but is very lazy with his speech. He is only 2 but I think he will probably need speech therapy. Sometimes I feel I didn't read to him enough or something. Anyhow, it's nice to know I'm not alone.

Ambyr said...

First of all, you are a great mom for getting on it. No offence to my dear mother but I had to go to speech therapy in like, fourth and fifth grade. And to be honest, it was embarrassing at that age but I AM grateful for it now. I say good for you for getting on it now before the speech issues effect her socially and academically.

Second of all, this post was so therapeutic for me! I am totally considering having Luke evaluated for focusing issues. Not sure what this even means but I'm getting that mommy feeling. Thanks for being brave enough to share. You are an inspiration.